An Episcopal, co-educational boarding school in Middletown, Delaware for grades 9 – 12

Walking to the Beat of Your Own Drum
Billy Brown

In this Wednesday night Chapel Talk, Billy Brown, a member of the St. Andrew's Security Team, encourages us all to step out of our comfort zones and to walk to the beat of your own drum.

In this Wednesday night Chapel Talk, Billy Brown, a member of the St. Andrew's Security Team, encourages us all to step out of our comfort zones and to walk to the beat of your own drum.

 

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Dance Students Perform at Wilmington Public Library During Anthony Ray Hinton Talk
Avi Gold

Two St. Andrew’s students, Stephanie Tanoh ’20 and Derek Ike ’23, traveled to the Wilmington Public Library last week to listen to talk by Anthony Ray Hinton and perform two dance pieces for Hinton and his audience. Hinton was exonerated from prison in 2015 after spending 30 years on Death Row in Alabama for a crime he did not commit, and in 2018 published a memoir of his wrongful imprisonment, The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row.

The St. Andrew’s Dance Program dedicated their Parents Weekend performance to Hinton; one piece included in that show was performed by Derek to a spoken-word excerpt of Hinton’s memoir—a passage in which Hinton recalls speaking in prison for the first time in three years. Director of Dance Avi Gold was first inspired to point his dance students in Hinton’s direction during V Form orientation in September, when Head of School Tad Roach read this same excerpt aloud to the junior class.

Derek performed his solo piece at the Wilmington Public Library reading, and Steph and Derek then performed a second piece that “speaks to finding one’s courage in this world,” Mr. Gold said. “Sometimes, as Mr. Brown so eloquently put it in his talk, doing that requires you to go out of your comfort zone.” You can watch Steph and Derek’s performance on YouTube.

“These two artists touched hearts in profound ways, as was evidenced in the audience’s standing ovation and their tear-filled eyes,” Gold said. “Even more powerful than their performance was a brilliant moment, just before the show, when Mr. Hinton put his hand on Derek's shoulder and said that the reason that he was doing all of this was for Derek, and all other young Black men. He explained that they needed to know his story as a warning—and as a message of hope, gratitude and forgiveness.”

“Meeting Anthony Ray Hinton was a great experience,” Derek said after the evening. “Performing was a little nerve-wracking! [He helped me to see]  how unforgiveness is like a poison to yourself. When you forgive somebody, this is setting yourself free. As an African-American male, it gives me a sense of responsibility to the world to be the best person you can be, and to prove others wrong. This reminds me of one of my favorite quotes: ‘Exceed the limits that are set and leave a legacy that can not be met.’”

After the performance, Steph wrote the following reflection: 

In the first week of school, Mr. Foehl led a powerful discussion on Anthony Ray Hinton’s book The Sun Does Shine. In the classroom, with both friends and classmates I have never spoken to before, we bonded over the compassion and anger we felt while unpacking Anthony Ray Hinton’s story. Mr. Hinton’s experience, though inspiring, is just one of the many stories we learned about black men unjustly targeted by the criminal justice system. So when Mr. Gold told me about this opportunity to dance for Mr. Hinton, I experienced an unfamiliar feeling—this was the first time I felt nervous to dance. I would not only be dancing in front of strangers, but  I would also be aiming to impress a specific person I admire. How was I supposed to embody this leader’s hardships and strengths all at the same time? This inevitably led me to start dancing in odd places such as the Dining Hall and in the van on my way to mentoring. My mind was focused on perfecting this dance that I had very little time to perfect. 

When we arrived at the library we were greeted with smiles. People were genuinely interested to see what we had to share. Five minutes before the performance, we all got to meet Mr. Hinton and Mr. Gold enthusiastically shared the story of our recent [Parents Weekend] dance performance, given in honor of Mr. Hinton’s story—a story that represents the strength and love that people have the capacity to possess. Mr. Hinton seemed honored, and spoke to Derek if he were his own son. Mr. Hinton asked Derek to remember that although he would face many challenges as a black man in society, if [Hinton] mwas able to forgive his oppressors and find purpose, Derek should be able to do the same as well. 

Dancing for Mr. Hinton and his guest was an amazing experience. I was given the opportunity to share my love for dance, but hearing Mr. Hinton’s talk was most definitely the best part of the trip. One could read his book, one could discuss his book, but this is not the same as hearing him tell his own story in front of your eyes. I couldn't have imagined the humor Mr. Hinton was able to bring to a situation that stole 30 years of his life. At times I wondered if I should be laughing because I could only imagine myself crying when recalling such difficult circumstances. Before I witnessed Mr. Hinton’s speech, his ability to mentally escape his 6x10 cell, and not only forgive, but love his greatest oppressor were achievements I thought only a spiritual being could accomplish—not a human being. I walked away from his talk knowing that although justice is not blind, and instead is quite intentional, love can be our greatest weapon against adversity.
 

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What Being Muslim Means to Me
Ibrahim Kazi ’23

In this Wednesday night Chapel Talk, delivering during our annual Diwali service, Ibrahim Kazi ’23 shares why he is proud to be a Muslim, and how he has shared and defended his religious identity to others in the past. 

In this Wednesday night Chapel Talk, delivering during our annual Diwali service, Ibrahim Kazi ’23 shares why he is proud to be a Muslim, and how he has shared and defended his religious identity to others in the past. 

 

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Saints Thump Hornets to Keep the Cannon
Pat Moffitt

On Saturday, St. Andrew's varsity football team competed in the 57th annual Cannon Game against Tatnall School. In this longstanding SAS athletic tradition, the Saints battle Tatnall each year for the rights to keep a cannon trophy for the next school year. The cannon has changed hands many times over the decades, but St. Andrew's has been the possessor for the past year after a 2018 victory, and looked to defend that victory this fall.

The Saints wasted no time in getting the scoring started. After a big kick return from Adrian Watts ’20 on the opening kickoff, the Saints offense got to work at Tatnall's 46 yard line. On the seventh play of the drive, Watts found Lamar Duncan ’20 over the middle for an 18-yard touchdown pass. On the extra point Mason McKee ’21 found Watts in the back corner of the endzone for a two-point conversion to give the Saints an early 8-0 lead that they would never relinquish.

A quick three-and-out of defense gave the Saints the ball back at their own 20 yard-line. This time it would take three plays to cover 80 yards for their next score. On the third play of the drive, Watts dropped back and found Duncan streaking down the right sideline where he hit him in stride. Duncan then outran the rest of the Tatnall defense for a 70 yard score.

The Saints defense took the field again, and on the second play of the drive Tre Thomas ’22 got pressure on the quarterback, forcing a fumble. Brandon Graves ’22 scooped it up and ran it in for a touchdown from 15 yards out. On the ensuing kickoff, Watts forced a fumble and Arush Puri ’21 recovered it to give the Saints possession in Tatnall's territory again. A few plays later Watts found Duncan again for their third scoring pass on the afternoon from 17 yards out.

Defensively, the Saints kept the pressure on; Graves forced a bad throw from the quarterback and Mike Lilley ’22 intercepted the errant pass. Three plays later Lilley threw a pass to Watts; Watts went up between a couple of defenders and pulled it down for a five-yard touchdown. At the end of the first quarter the Saints held a commanding 36-0 lead.

A Tim Odutola ’20 interception in the second quarter set the Saints up for one more score in the first half; Watts found Graves behind the defense for a 37-yard scoring strike to increase the lead to 43-0 before the break.

The second half featured a lot of running for the Saints on offense and the defense continued to stifle Tatnall. The final points of the day came when Thomas took a handoff and sprinted right through the middle of the defense for a 22-yard touchdown run. The game concluded with a final score of 50-0.

Watts had a big day in his last game is a Saints uniform: he completed 8 of 11 passes for 180 yards and four touchdowns; he also caught two passes for 24 yards and one touchdown. On the year Watts shattered a number of single-season passing records including completion percentage (58%), completions (105), passing yards (1,652), passing yards per game (165.2) and touchdown passes (20). He finished the season with 2,390 yards of total offense and 33 total touchdowns. Duncan also had another big performance with six receptions for 131 yards and three touchdowns. He is now the single-season record holder for receptions in a season (56), receiving yards (860), receiving yards per game (95.6) and touchdown receptions (7); his three touchdown receptions Saturday also tied a single-game record. On defense, Dante Soriano ’20, Watts, Duncan and McKee all led the team with five tackles a piece. Lilley added an interception and fumble recovery, Odutola had an interception, while Thomas, Phineas Hunt ’22 and Nick Oxnam ’22 all recorded a sack.

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Watts Named Buffalo Wild Wings Athlete of the Week!
Jacob Myers

Adrian Watts ’20 was named the Buffalo Wild Wings Athlete of the Week (Delaware) for his outstanding performance this past weekend against Conrad School. In the Saints' 28-22 victory, Watts completed 14 of 20 passes for 312 yards, four touchdowns, and added 64 yards on the ground. On defense he had eight tackles, three forced fumbles, one tackle for loss and one pass break-up.

The Saints, now 5-4 on the year, host Tatnall School in the 57th annual Cannon Game tomorrow afternoon. Kickoff is set for 12:00 p.m. Go Saints!

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