How Long?
Tad Roach

 

It is August, a time of anticipation, preparation, and excitement for schools across the country. Students are buying back-to-school clothes and supplies. Parents quietly hope that their children will soon meet teachers who are skilled, kind, accepting, and thoughtful.

As educators, we have enough time in August to remind ourselves of the sacred and inspiring mission and work of schools.

We teachers prepare our courses and classrooms. We know we are sharing the wisdom, habits of mind and heart, recognitions, discoveries, and explorations that have led our country and world into both miracles and disasters.

We try to help our students find their way to creative expressions of peace, humanity, and solidarity as they study the human story in all its complexity.

We pledge on these August days to educate in such powerful ways that our students will succeed us with courage, grace, and honor. Maybe, just maybe, they as citizens will love fiercely enough to begin to heal and rescue a fallen world. 

We start by building cultures within our classrooms and schools, emphasizing the dignity of all in our communities and especially looking out for anyone who seems uncertain, insecure, invisible, or frightened.

Our students in this generation seem remarkably eager to respect and honor one another; they actively seek others who have different experiences, cultures, viewpoints, identities. They seek unity in diversity. The are impatient with ideologies of hatred, division, intolerance, and fear. They look at the adult world of paralysis and fear with growing contempt and impatience. 

It is August, and we could say that the events in El Paso last weekend remind us of what we witnessed in Charlottesville two years ago when ancient and poisonous hatred, prejudice, and violence suddenly sought expression and erupted on the streets of a town dedicated in large part to education. We sadly are not surprised at the early designation of the massacre as a “hate crime”, for we know that we in America continue to deny or forget just what happens when we demonize, objectify, and scapegoat the Other.

We have declared victory again and again in this country against these forces of hatred, only to find that as long as we have despair and desolation in our land, the sparks of hatred and division can always be ignited again. Those who worship hatred, intolerance, racism, and violence find affirmation from one another on the internet and yes, they hear, honor, respond to mainstream voices that deliberately or foolishly encourage and profit from vitriol and violence.  

We have held celebrations of how much we have learned and how far we have come in America, only to return to moments like these.

We put guns into everyone’s hands.

As schools open in the wake of these shootings this month, I say again to the politicians on the left and right that it is completely unacceptable for children to be arriving and schools to be opening this year with the ever-present threat of shootings in our midst. 

It is contrary to a free society, to our democracy, and to the principles of education.

It is unspeakable to ask a generation of children to run, hide, or fight in a school dedicated to learning, collaboration, and engagement in the community. 

It is a complete failure of our democratic government to ask teachers to awaken young minds and at the same time prepare for the violence of warfare in the hallways. 

It is appalling that law enforcement personnel know that at any moment they must put their lives on the line to protect our community’s precious and innocent children.

Our colleagues in education throughout the world wonder why American schools operate in a culture of lockdowns, gates, and security screenings. They wonder what happened to the promise and spirit of the world’s greatest democracy.

Yet here we are again, lighting candles of mourning, solidarity, and sympathy, preaching love and peace, while the threats remain unaddressed, unmentioned, and untouched. For over twenty years now, our schools and colleges, churches, mosques, synagogues, concerts, movie theatres, malls, stores, and public spaces have been subjected again and again to violence and human carnage. We do nothing.

St. Andrew’s mourns the deaths caused by shootings in Dayton, El Paso, and Gilroy.

We again ask, “How Long?"
 

  • Headmaster News
  • Homepage News
Summer Reading & 2019-2020 Visiting Authors
Elizabeth Roach

Summer reading assignments and suggestions have been posted to the SAS library website. In addition to this year's all-School read—Transatlantic by Colum McCann—you are asked to read two other books from the required reading list, all of which have been recommended by St. Andrew's faculty.

Next year, we have several brilliant visiting writers coming to campus. We're excited to announce that Colum McCann, who won the National Book Award in 2009 for Let the Great World Spin, will visit St. Andrew's for a day next year. At the end of the school year, we gave all current students a copy of TransAtlantic. Students should bring their book back to school with them - we will be studying the novel in all English classes next year before McCann's visit.

In fact, as you read TransAtlantic, and get to know the fictional version of Frederick Douglass that McCann creates in its pages, students may also want to dip into the work of renowned historian David Blight, whose recent biography, Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom (2018), which just won both the Pulitzer and Bancroft Prizes, among many others. Since we are always interested in how different disciplines can learn from one another—something you can see in the vast array of books suggested by the faculty—Professor Blight will be visiting on campus this year as well and will engage in a conversation with Colum McCann.

Additionally, in the fall, Richard Blanco—an American poet, author, civil engineer, and President Obama's second inaugural poet—will spend a day with our students. I strongly recommend reading his poetry collection In Looking for the Gulf Motel and his memoir, The Prince of Los Cocuyos: A Miami Childhood. In these works, he explores his Cuban heritage and his role as a gay man in Cuban-American culture. We are thrilled that he will be one or our visiting writers next year!

There is no summer homework beyond the required reading, but fun enrichment resources can also found on the summer work website, if you wish to keep in practice in your favorite subjects for the fall.

Summer reading assignments and suggestions have been posted to the SAS library website. In addition to this year's all-School read—Transatlantic by Colum McCann—you are asked to read two other books from the required reading list, all of which have been recommended by St. Andrew's faculty.

Next year, we have several brilliant visiting writers coming to campus. We're excited to announce that Colum McCann, who won the National Book Award in 2009 for Let the Great World Spin, will visit St. Andrew's for a day next year. At the end of the school year, we gave all current students a copy of TransAtlantic. Students should bring their book back to school with them - we will be studying the novel in all English classes next year before McCann's visit.

In fact, as you read TransAtlantic, and get to know the fictional version of Frederick Douglass that McCann creates in its pages, students may also want to dip into the work of renowned historian David Blight, whose recent biography, Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom (2018), which just won both the Pulitzer and Bancroft Prizes, among many others. Since we are always interested in how different disciplines can learn from one another—something you can see in the vast array of books suggested by the faculty—Professor Blight will be visiting on campus this year as well and will engage in a conversation with Colum McCann.

Additionally, in the fall, Richard Blanco—an American poet, author, civil engineer, and President Obama's second inaugural poet—will spend a day with our students. I strongly recommend reading his poetry collection In Looking for the Gulf Motel and his memoir, The Prince of Los Cocuyos: A Miami Childhood. In these works, he explores his Cuban heritage and his role as a gay man in Cuban-American culture. We are thrilled that he will be one or our visiting writers next year!

There is no summer homework beyond the required reading, but fun enrichment resources can also found on the summer work website, if you wish to keep in practice in your favorite subjects for the fall.