Values & Goals

St. Andrew’s fosters inclusivity, equity, and open dialogue in the classroom, dormitories, and all co-curricular activities. To this end, we must practice a culture of inclusion in our learning and living spaces where each individual is treated fairly, his experience feels respected and valued, and she is supported in every area of school life. Students and faculty alike must model the School’s values, demonstrate commitment to inclusion, and support each other in developing the leadership and inclusion competencies necessary to participate in an engaged and thriving School body. We must treat each other with respect by listening to different viewpoints and embracing topics and conversations that may feel unsettling, thereby crafting brave spaces where personal and professional growth can occur.

A St. Andrew’s student:

  • displays empathy, models kindness, and lives with integrity
  • can communicate effectively and have positive interactions with adults and peers;
  • advocates for own needs
  • values and relates to peers of different backgrounds
  • seeks to learn from those who are different
  • recognizes and manages own biases

Diversity Work In Action

Diversity & Equity Education

Our robust and active Diversity Education Program leads our community in regular and structured engagement with and careful exploration of our differences, enabling us to come together more effectively as an authentic and cohesive community. The goal of the Diversity Education Program is twofold: to help individuals examine and understand the varied perspectives and backgrounds present within our community, as well as to consider those groups who may not be directly represented; and to develop habits of heart and mind in our students, faculty, and staff that will help us to identify biases, engage in challenging conversations, and practice empathy.

The Diversity Education Program organizes an annual student-led Equity Conference for the School community, brings outside speakers to campus, and provides equity-based orientation coursework for all students. The program also facilitates annual student and faculty participation in a number of diversity conferences: the Student Diversity Leadership Conference (SDLC), the NAIS People of Color Conference, the Mid-Atlantic Region Diversity Conference, and the Better Understanding for a Better World Conference (an annual intercultural, interfaith, and leadership conference for high school students). Students can also join the entirely student-led Diversity Stewards program, in which students meet every two weeks in small groups to take part in activities and discussions that explore issues of difference, equity, and social justice.

The development of a culturally competent and bias-aware student body is also the responsibility of every St. Andrew’s faculty member and department. Keeping this fundamental principle in mind, diversity and inclusion work aims to involve as many faculty participants as are willing to collaborate, design, and carry out programming throughout the school year. Inclusion programming also aims to root itself across departments, grounding itself firmly in the daily experience of students both inside and outside of the classroom.

Ally & Affinity Groups

Affinity Groups

  • Asian
  • Girls Collaborative
  • Guys Group
  • International House
  • La Casa Latina
  • LGBTQ
  • Multiracial
  • Onyx
  • Sapphire
  • Young Republicans

Ally Groups

  • Diversity Stewards
  • Gay-Straight Alliance
  • Students Fighting Against Racism (White Allies)

Recent Visiting Speakers

Meet the SAS Multi-Racial Affinity Group

In May of this year, the School's Multi-Racial Affinity Group (MRAG) led a Friday afternoon Chapel service. During the service, six MRAG members gave a brief talk about their experiences as a multiracial person and student at St. Andrew's. Listen to one or all of their eye-opening talks below.
Rejecting a Single Category

Cindy Lay '18 recounts how her involvement in St. Andrew's Mulit-Racial Affinity Group has helped her to let go of the need to categorize herself as a particular race.

The Challenge of Misidentification

Baylen Manocha '18 recalls how, despite his own negative experiences with racial misidentification, he too has misidentified the race of his classmates.

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